These are the risks of contraception in women

Various methods of preventing pregnancy in women can increase cancer risks by up to 38%, depending on how long you've been using them.

Contraceptive pills

According to the Planned Parenthood Federation of America Inc, all medications, including birth control pills, can cause side effects. Photo: Pixabay

LatinAmerican Post | Carlex Araujo

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Leer en español: Estos son los riesgos de los anticonceptivos en las mujeres

There are many options for birth control to choose from. Some methods are more effective than others to prevent pregnancy, according to the Contraceptive Methods Guide approved by the US Frood & Drug Administration (FDA), they can be:

  1. Female and male sterilization (tubal ligation or occlusion in women, vasectomy in men): A contraceptive method that permanently prevents pregnancy (in most cases) through surgery or a medical procedure.
  2. Reversible contraceptives or long-acting "LARC" methods (intrauterine devices, hormonal implants): contraceptive that the doctor inserts it only once and you do not have to remember that you carry it for months. LARCs last from 3 to 10 years, depending on the method.
  3. Short-acting hormonal methods (pill, patch, injection, intravaginal ring): contraceptive that your doctor prescribes and you must remember to take it every day or month. The injection should be given by your doctor every 3 months.
  4. Barrier methods (condoms, diaphragms, sponge, or cervical cap) - The contraceptive you use every time you have sex.
  5. Natural Rhythm Methods : You don't use one type of birth control, but instead avoid having sex and / or use birth control only on the days you are most fertile (the days you are most likely to get pregnant). An ovulation home test kit or fertility monitor can help you track your most fertile days, according to the Office for Women's Health (OASH) in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health in the Department of Health and Human Services from the USA

De los 14 métodos anticonceptivos que agrupa la OMS, 12 son para mujeres y solo dos para hombres: Vasectomía y condón.

Vaslgel es una inyección reversible no hormonal para hombres. ???????? Checa este video de @AnimalMX. https://t.co/jFbC5g6aCm

— Animal Político (@Pajaropolitico) May 2, 2021

Side Effects of Contraceptive Use in Women

According to the Planned Parenthood Federation of America Inc, all medications, including birth control pills, can cause side effects . The most common side effects are: bleeding, breast tenderness, nausea, or headaches. However, not everyone who takes pills has them, and when they happen, they usually go away after 2 to 3 months.

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Women's health risks

Breast cancer

An analysis of data from more than 150,000 women who participated in 54 epidemiological studies showed that, overall, women who have ever used oral contraceptives had a slight (7%) increased relative risk of breast cancer compared to women who had never used oral contraceptives. Women who were currently using oral contraceptives had a 24% increased risk that did not increase with the duration of use, according to the National Cancer Institute (NIH).

On the other hand, in 2017, women who were using or who had recently stopped using combined hormonal contraceptives had a modest increase (about 20%) in the relative risk of breast cancer compared to women who never used oral contraceptives . The increased risk ranged from 0% to 60%, depending on the specific type of combined hormone oral contraceptive.

Cervical cancer

Women who have used oral contraceptives for 5 years or more have a higher risk of cervical cancer than women who have never used oral contraceptives. One study found a 10% increased risk for less than 5 years of use; 60% danger for 5 to 9 years of use, and double the risk for 10 or more years. However, the risk of cervical cancer has been found to decrease over time after women stop using oral contraceptives, according to the National Cancer Institute (NIH).

Endometrial cancer

Women who have ever used oral contraceptives have a lower risk of endometrial cancer than women who have not used oral contraceptives . The risk is reduced by at least 30%, with a greater reduction from using oral contraceptives for longer. An analysis of women who participated in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study found that the risk reduction was especially pronounced in long-term oral contraceptive users who smoked, were obese, or rarely exercised.

Ovarian cancer

Women who have ever used oral contraceptives have a 30-50% lower risk of ovarian cancer than women who have never used oral contraceptives .

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