5 Latina Women Whose Sustainable Brands We Should Embrace

The Woman Post brings you a list of alternative brands owned by Latinas that bet on the environment!.

The Woman Post | Catalina Mejía Pizano

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Did you know that 80% of all clothing is landfilled or incinerated? As mentioned by the House of Common Environmental Audit Committee, "Clothing production is the third biggest manufacturing industry after the automotive and technology industries. Textile production contributes more to climate change than international aviation and shipping combined."

But what can consumers do about it? According to Mc Kinsey and Company, "The average consumer purchased 60% more items of clothing in 2014 than in 2000, but kept each garment for half as long, whether because the garment fell apart, went out of style, or was simply viewed as disposable." What worries experts the most, is that the situation is only getting worse. If the environmental consequences of fashion, weren’t sad enough, it is only necessary to take a look at the situation of fast fashion workers. It is no secret that millions of garment workers around the world suffer from human rights violations and live under conditions of extreme poverty.

The Woman Post brings you a list of alternative brands owned by Latinas that bet on the environment!

1. Kleeng Wear

Owned by Catalina Chavarro, and made in Colombia with 100% local raw materials. The brand reutilizes the leftover samples and fabrics from production to make other types of garments. Kleeng Wear brings colorful and original ponchos for cold weather. If you are wondering what a poncho is, it's a garment from South America made of a thick piece of woolen cloth with a slit in the middle for the head.

2. All For Ramon

Founded by two Mexican American sisters who named their brand after their brother who died of cancer. Their garments are sewn, assembled, and shipped from California, and their packaging is 100% recyclable. They use low-impact dyes that are free of toxic chemicals. All For Ramon, partnered with the organization One Tree Planted, to fight against deforestation.

3. ESCVDO

ESCVDO is a Peruvian-inspired luxury brand, founded by sisters Chiara and Giuliana Macchiavello, born in Lima and fashion students in London. Their clothing is ethically made and is created by employing ancestral weaving techniques to elaborate modern clothing. They use organic Pima cotton, from the coastal region of Pisco. They also use Alpaca cotton from Peru and work together with local artisans to support them and as a way to guarantee the preservation of their traditional techniques.

Also read: ARIENE JAMILE QUEIROZ, CONQUEROR OF THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR

4. Wasi Clothing

Wasi Clothing is a Brown-Latina-owned, Bolivian-American small business based in California. They seek to represent Bolivian culture in their garments and to be as sustainable and ethical as possible. All of their clothes are made by a team of people of color, with sustainable textiles, conscious packaging, and representing Bolivian culture.

5. Woven Futures

Woven Futures is a slow fashion brand that celebrates Latin America’s artisans and vibrant textile culture by timeless designs. They seek to preserve indigenous weaving techniques using toxic-free dyes. They are based in Guatemala and the United States. The story of Woven Futures begins when their founder Hannah meets several artisans in Guatemala (her home country) who struggled to sell their amazing garments. She decided to connect them to the fashion industry, fighting at the same time against fast fashion and unethical practices!

So what are you waiting for to support ethical brands while wearing the most unique and beautiful designs? Tag your pictures wearing your favorite sustainable brands owned by Latinas and tag us with the hashtag #TheWomanPost on social media. You can find us on Twitter and Instagram as @The_WomanPost, and on Facebook as The Woman Post.

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